Cosmetic Surgery Today

Plastic Surgery News, Costs of Cosmetic Surgery and Elective Procedures Blog

Study Suggests Botox Can Prevent Migraine Pain

Posted by Cosmetic Surgery Review on March 1, 2010

Botox continues to be one of the most sought-after procedures for getting rid of fine lines and wrinkles and deep grooves in the forehead, but it also has several non-cosmetic uses. Over the years, many doctors have reached for this injectable for off-label purposes such as reducing excessive sweating, and even treating migraines. A preliminary study now suggests that botulinum injections can reduce the frequency of migraine headaches, and may be effective for treating migraine pain for the long-term.

A report published in the February issue of the Archives of Dermatology indicates that Botox injections can help to reduce the number of migraine episodes a patient receives, but may not be equally as effective for reducing the pain and pressure that many migraine sufferers experience.

Approximately 28 million Americans are affected by migraine headaches, and the pain can be severe enough to leave the sufferer severely debilitated for several hours. Researchers of the study reported very favorable outcomes when the sufferers received botulinum injections, and some reported a reduction in migraine pain approximately three months after treatment.

According to the study, migraine frequency was reduced from an average of 6.8 days per month to an average of 0.7 days per month. Patient with exploding headaches saw an average reduction in migraine frequency of 11.4 days per month to 9.4 days per month.

The authors of the study state that, “These preliminary data are intriguing, and our results provide support for the hypothesis that patients with migraine that is characterized by imploding and ocular headaches are more responsive to botulinum toxin type A than those with migraine characterized by exploding headaches…our findings invite consideration of using botulinum toxin type A injections to prevent migraine headaches and may promote the role of the dermatologist in the treatment of patients with migraine.” (Source: Archives of Dermatology)

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