Cosmetic Surgery Today

Plastic Surgery News, Costs of Cosmetic Surgery and Elective Procedures Blog

Doctor Says Botox Warnings Are Over-Sensationalized

Posted by Cosmetic Surgery Review on September 5, 2009

Botox safety concerns have been in the media lately as dozens of patients report Botox abuse and the effects of bad Botox procedures from unqualified surgeons. While Botox is responsible for causing allergic reactions and adverse reactions in some people, it has been approved as a safe and effective treatment by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and does not intrinsically pose any major health risks.

Dr. Jean D. Carruthers, clinical professor of ophthalmology at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada explains that while there has been some recent animal research and cases reported about the negative effects of Botox, the injectable is still relatively safe when used for cosmetic procedures by a qualified professional.

The negative publicity that Botox has received is, according to Dr. Carruthers, minimal when you consider that thousands of men and women are still booking up procedures in major cities across the country in the midst of the ‘scare.’

Patients are advised to do some researcha bout the doctor or medical spa that will be administering the injection so they can trust they are receiving an authentic product, and not a Botox knock off.

Still, it can be difficult to determine if a knock-off product will be administered. Surgeons and nurses have been in the news lately for hiding information about the  actual product they have administered, and even promoting the Botox brand and label but switching the product at the last minute.

While these are among the rare cases of Botox abuse, Dr. Carruthers believe that these types of stories get their fair share of the media spotlight, but the negative press and warnings about Botox may be over-sensationalized.

Researchers have published several studies that show that the injections are still safe to use on humans at their prescribed doses. Dr. Carruthers and her husband Alastair Carruthers, M.D. have been reviewing 851 Botox treatment sessions in 50 subjects as part of their own safety study, and are used to seeing only transient complications.

(Source: ModernMedicine.com)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: